Situated on Barbados’s rugged northern coast where crashing waves slam into 50-foot cliffs, an old hotel dies. Abandoned years ago and victim to the Atlantic Ocean’s briny wind, the North Point Surf Resort is literally a shell of its past.

For years, its 48-rooms were filled with international tourists, United States Navy soldiers stationed at a now closed base, and local Barbadians enjoying its remoteness. Perhaps its out-of-the way location on Barbados’s northern crown was the cause of the hotel’s eventual demise.

All that remains of the Surf Resort is a husk of rusting rebar, peeling paint and crumbling cement. The Olympic-sized pool was ringed with umbrellas (see the vintage postcard below) and filled with tourists and competitive swimmers. Two high-dive spring boards cast divers into the deep end. Today, the overgrown cement high-dive steps bow over algae- and trash-filled muck.

For many years, the property was for sale. I’ve reached out to local real estate brokers but could not get a definitive answer about its current status. A local lawyer represents the property but as of publishing they did respond to my inquiry.

In 2014, the Barbadian government considered buying and redeveloping the property but the project never came to fruition.

Each time I visit the ruins, I fantasize about its heyday and what was lost. I also wonder what it could become. Perhaps in another life with deep pockets or hotelier ambitions, I would restore or transform the dying resort into a Barbadian oasis.


Barbados’s Sugar Cane Revolution

Barbados’s sugar cane history traces hundreds of years, many cultures (African, European, Brazilian), and ushered in fabulous wealth. For generations, sugar cane fueled Barbadian (and British) prosperity. A shift in global markets and the rise of European sugar beet decimated … Continued


Saharan Dust Gets Tropical, Barbados-Style

Africa’s Saharan Desert winds blow across the Atlantic, carrying dust, ash and biological entities hitching an ocean-spanning ride. Since 1996, Edmund Blades has managed the University of Miami’s Barbados Atmospheric Chemistry Observatory and it’s 17-meter tall tower. Situated on Ragged … Continued


Such Great Barbadian (Saharan) Heights

Africa’s Saharan Desert winds blow across the Atlantic, carrying dust, ash and biological entities hitching an ocean-spanning ride. Since 1996, Edmund Blades has managed the University of Miami’s Barbados Atmospheric Chemistry Observatory and it’s 17-meter tall tower. Situated on Ragged … Continued


Nature’s Protector: Barbados’s Sea Turtle Project (P. 1)

Carla Daniels has led Barbados Sea Turtle Project for 15-years, protecting the island’s migratory and permanent sea turtle population. Seven-days a week, 24-hours a day, Carla (and an army of local and international volunteers) search the island for sea turtles. … Continued


Nature Publishes My Sweetest Images Ever

Jagged stalks of sugar cane cover Barbados’s coral rock landscape. As the island’s cash crop, Barbados produced 92,000 tons of sugar in 2021 despite being covered in volcanic ash from St. Vincent’s La Soufrière’s spring eruption. Another harvest will begin … Continued


Safe in Barbadian Surf

Barbadian life is full of contradictions. Generally it’s a safe island whose crime is concentrated in impoverished neighborhoods often saturated with drugs and gangs. Outside of those, as these photos affirm, crime – including theft – is minimal. At Brandon’s … Continued


Barbados Night Moves

Crashing waves and a Barbadian night make for beautifully calming photos in the world’s COVID storm COVID disrupted and dislodged our lives in so many ways. From where we call home to the way we shop to the way we … Continued


Live and Direct from Public Records

What seems like a lifetime ago, I shared photos from Public Records, a Brooklyn nightclub and cafe with an amazing hi-fi sound system. Situated in the gritty (and rapidly gentrifying) Gowanus neighborhood, Public Records books world-renowned musicians, DJs and artists … Continued