Grenada might be considered an off-the-beaten-path Caribbean island but it’s one of my favorites. Situated in the southern Caribbean just below St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Grenada has it all: cascading waterfalls, rainforest hikes, endless beaches and delicious local cuisine.

Grand Anse is Spice Island’s most iconic beach. The two-mile long eden contrasts the energy of St. George’s (Grenada’s capital city) across the bay. Yes, the city name’s apostrophe “s” possessive appendix is as correct as it is awkward.

Near Grand Anse, other beaches with names like Magazine Beach, Pink Gin Beach and Grooms Beach trace the Devil’s Bay waterfront. Grand Anse, mentioned above is a bit more crowded and arguably the most popular with its resorts, bars, restaurants and tourist infrastructure. It was worth an afternoon soak and a meal, but the other beaches easily earned my affection.

My favorite was Magazine Beach, the low-key yin to Grand Anse’s bustling yang. Situated at the end of Point Salines – where the waves break a bit rougher, fewer people amble and palm trees frame an oceanfront that doubles as nature’s barrier to the resorts hidden behind their razor-sharp fronds.

Finding Magazine Beach proved a bit of a challenge. The correct road, if you can call it that, was a steep, cement two track that required a perilously steep trust-fall downhill drive. I kept doubting it was the road and missed it a few times. Luckily I ended up at a restaurant right next to it at the end of Magazine Beach. The Aquarium was the perfect mistake with its beachfront bar, loungers and a tree swing for soaking up the beauty and Caribbean breeze.

Below are my favorite photos from Magazine Beach. The first one captures the popularity of sailing around the region, especially through St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines and Grenada (don’t forget Grenada’s satellite islands Carriacou and Petite Martinique).

The second captures a perfect Magazine Beach moment as the day fades into a beautiful Caribbean night.


St. Vincent’s Volcanic Hero

Hot off the press! My latest photo essay for Nature. I traveled to St. Vincent and the Grenadines to photograph Dr. Richie Robertson, the renowned expert in Caribbean volcanology. Richie’s research focuses on St. Vincent’s La Soufriere, a massive volcano … Continued


A Message From Paradise

Dear John, In dark times like these, it’s easy to forget how beautiful our world really is. I’ve always tried to find the time to watch sunsets and tonight’s effort was no disappointment thanks to the passing hurricane. Hurricane Tammy … Continued


Barbados’s Decaying Cotton Tower Signal Station

Cotton Tower Signal Station peeks above the surrounding sugar cane fields like a pink periscope surveying the lush ocean of Barbadian paradise. Located in St. Joseph parish (near Bathsheba’s world-class surf break Soup Bowl), the tower is named after Lady … Continued


Dr. Damian Cohall and The Power of Barbadian Plant Medicine

Barbados’s rich history of medicinal plants traces its roots to the 1627 arrival of enslaved Africans. Imported to toil in the island’s unforgiving sugarcane fields, their indigenous knowledge kept the island’s population healthy despite adversity. Today, western medicine is the … Continued


Barbados’s Crumbling North Point Surf Resort

Situated on Barbados’s rugged northern coast where crashing waves slam into 50-foot cliffs, an old hotel dies. Abandoned years ago and victim to the Atlantic Ocean’s briny wind, the North Point Surf Resort is literally a shell of its past. … Continued


Barbados’s Sugar Cane Revolution

Barbados’s sugar cane history traces hundreds of years, many cultures (African, European, Brazilian), and ushered in fabulous wealth. For generations, sugar cane fueled Barbadian (and British) prosperity. A shift in global markets and the rise of European sugar beet decimated … Continued


Saharan Dust Gets Tropical, Barbados-Style

Africa’s Saharan Desert winds blow across the Atlantic, carrying dust, ash and biological entities hitching an ocean-spanning ride. Since 1996, Edmund Blades has managed the University of Miami’s Barbados Atmospheric Chemistry Observatory and it’s 17-meter tall tower. Situated on Ragged … Continued


Such Great Barbadian (Saharan) Heights

Africa’s Saharan Desert winds blow across the Atlantic, carrying dust, ash and biological entities hitching an ocean-spanning ride. Since 1996, Edmund Blades has managed the University of Miami’s Barbados Atmospheric Chemistry Observatory and it’s 17-meter tall tower. Situated on Ragged … Continued


Nature’s Protector: Barbados’s Sea Turtle Project (P. 1)

Carla Daniels has led Barbados Sea Turtle Project for 15-years, protecting the island’s migratory and permanent sea turtle population. Seven-days a week, 24-hours a day, Carla (and an army of local and international volunteers) search the island for sea turtles. … Continued